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Willey88
10-08-2005, 12:49 PM
How does the Thermal Dry floor matting system work? I understand that it prevents water vapor from getting into the carpet or padding directly. What prevents the vapor from eventually condensating? Also, if the outside edge of the tiles on the perimiter of the room are either installed right up against or behind the studs/sheetrock of a finished wall, what prevents the vapor from causing problems on the bottom edge of the wall or to the insulation and studs behind it? Seems like the vapor would either have access to the bottom of the wall or get vented behind it depending on how it was installed.

Thanks.

Basement MD
10-11-2005, 02:21 PM
The ThermalDry floor matting (http://www.basementsystems.com/basement_waterproofing/basement_floor/) does act as a vapor barrier and helps prevent moisture from entering the carpet and padding directly. It also makes for a warmer and softer floor surface. If there is a moisture or vapor transmission problem you may still need some type of dehumidification system (http://www.basementsystems.com/basement_waterproofing/basement_dehumidifier.php)to remove the moisture from the air and basement environment. (http://www.basementsystems.com/learning_center/dehumidification/humidity.php)

Willey88
10-11-2005, 10:19 PM
So, are you saying that the tiles allowing moisture/vapor to have constant contact with the base of the wall won't be a problem? Venting behind it won't be a problem either? I plan to have a dehumidifier, but I'm thinking about the moisture/vapor venting from under the floor tiles, getting behind the wall and, over time, causing problems with the insulation, studs, etc. Seems like the dehumidifier would only get to handle what little bit that comes back through the wall and into the main room. Also, is there a guarantee on this? Your flooring seems like a good idea and I just want to make sure.

Thanks.

Basement MD
10-12-2005, 09:29 AM
What i'm saying is Thermaldry flooring is not a total solution by itself. Certainly we want to minimize the amout of moisture entering any building materials and try to keep the relative humidity below 50% in the room.

You must remember if the ThermalDry was a closed systems you might get condensation forming below the tile and you would have to install ducted dehumidification system below the flooring.

I do beleive that the benefits of ThermalDry truely out weigh any negatives. ThermalDry Floor Matting has specific performance warranty.

Willey88
10-26-2005, 11:28 PM
Where can I get a copy of the warranty? I don't mean to be a pain, but I had problems in the basement floor of my old house from improperly ventilated moisture. The previous owner put down a rubber carpet pad that trapped the moisture. Over time, the surface of the floor started to break down a bit. I had one of your reps out to our new house and I'm sold on the Super Sump, the Water Guard, a couple of lines of FlexiSpan and even the Thermal Dry Wall system. My basement will look like a Basement Systems showroom when I'm done (I've already steered one of my neighbors toward your solutions for their basement with all the rain we had recently), but I have some concerns about the floor matting. Any help in making this part of the decision is greatly appreciated.

Basement MD
10-27-2005, 08:06 AM
The ThermalDry floor matting has no specific performance warranty. I apologize for my previous reply when I left the word "no" out of the statement.

Willey88
10-27-2005, 11:50 PM
No warranty and no guarantee? Hmmmmm....

Considering I'm not far from putting in a large order as I described earlier and I'm steering neighbors' business your way, can you elaborate on how the matting system works to prevent vapor/moisture from damaging the cement floor surface and the bottom of the sheetrock walls if the matting tiles are butted up against them? Seems like, although there will be less moisture as a result of installing other parts of your system in my basement as I descibed in my earlier post, the vapor/moisture that does get through the cement floor will be trapped in a closed system under the tiles and between the walls. You mentioned in your earlier post that would be a problem and could require ducted dehumidification under the floor. While I want it done right, I don't think I can do anything that elaborate.

Basement MD
10-28-2005, 07:35 AM
I greatly appreciate your business and the referals. However I think the best way to resolve any questions at this point is to have you visit our office where we have a display or have the sales rep come back out with samples to explain exactly what you can expect.