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trevorek
01-24-2009, 03:39 PM
So, general question for you all - I've heard that, if you have a foundation problem, it's not from the aging of the house, like most would think. I've heard that most of the problems that come from a foundation of a house come right after the home is built because of the construction. Is this true? And with this, how do you know if your foundation needs help or if it can last a few more years before it needs to be completely altered?

JacquesBouchard
01-26-2009, 09:45 AM
So, general question for you all - I've heard that, if you have a foundation problem, it's not from the aging of the house, like most would think. I've heard that most of the problems that come from a foundation of a house come right after the home is built because of the construction. Is this true? And with this, how do you know if your foundation needs help or if it can last a few more years before it needs to be completely altered?

That's a pretty accurate statement, trevorek.

Many home foundations being built today have their foundations laid before the concrete has fully cured. As it dries and shrinks, it's easy for large cracks to form in the foundation walls as a result.

Additionally, as the gap outside of the foundation (between the foundation wall and the unexcavated soil outside) is backfilled, the soil adds a sudden temperature change and weight against the walls. When rocks are also used in backfill, their impacts can worsen the situation significantly.

However, that's not to say that foundations can't fail because they're getting old. Poor supporting soils, hydrostatic pressure, and many other problems can also cause foundation problems.

We have a great section on foundation issues (http://www.basementsystems.com/foundation-repair/) on our site. Check it out for more info! :-)

trevorek
01-29-2009, 03:46 AM
Thank you for your detailed answer and for the link JacquesBouchard.
I appreciate it!

trevorek
01-29-2009, 04:00 AM
Thank you for your detailed answer and for the link JacquesBouchard.
I appreciate it!

JacquesBouchard
01-29-2009, 07:53 AM
You're very welcome! :-) We're always happy to help out!

Thank you for your detailed answer and for the link JacquesBouchard.
I appreciate it!

mehws25
11-10-2009, 11:15 AM
I bought my house about 2 1/2 years ago. It was brand new and we were the first to live in it. About two months after we moved in I noticed a crack in the foundation. I called up the builder and had him come take a look at it. He said that about 50% of homes have these hairline cracks. As long as they don't get real big it is actually quite normal to get these cracks. It's just the real big cracks that you have to watch out for.

JacquesBouchard
11-11-2009, 07:44 AM
I bought my house about 2 1/2 years ago. It was brand new and we were the first to live in it. About two months after we moved in I noticed a crack in the foundation. I called up the builder and had him come take a look at it. He said that about 50% of homes have these hairline cracks. As long as they don't get real big it is actually quite normal to get these cracks. It's just the real big cracks that you have to watch out for.

Hairline cracks do happen. One good test to see if this is a problem that gets worse is to draw a pencil line across the crack and date it. Every 6 months or so, come back and draw a new line. If the original line becomes uneven, then you know one side of the wall is shifting at a different rate than the other. If you see that, or the crack widens enough that you can fit a dime in it, it's a good idea to call a foundation repair contractor to take a look. I recommend Foundation Supportworks, who are international and offer free foundation repair quotes (http://www.foundationsupportworks.com/contact.php), so you have nothing to lose.