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Flood Resources for all 50 States

Tuesday, July 14th by Shannon Brelsford


Flood in the street with sign

When disaster strikes and our homes are damaged, we can often be left floundering, wondering what comes next. The stress of a basement flood is a lot to handle, water comes on fast, and it doesn’t stop for anything. Not to mention the ramifications beyond the general property destruction. Thankfully, we’re no stranger to floods in the United States--we’ve got you covered. 

What’s the first step?

The first step after any home water event, if possible, is to first turn off the electricity, and then remove as much water as you can. If you have a shop vac, this is a good tool for the job. The main objective is removing as much moisture as you can to prevent mass mold and rot issues, mostly to your belongings, but also to building materials--such as if the basement is finished. 

Once you’ve gotten as much water out as possible, you’ll need to find the source of the water. Typically with basement groundwater floods, the water finds an entry through cracks in the foundation, basement floor, or up through the joints around the perimeter of the basement. However, it’s not uncommon to find that a weak window seal could be the root of the issue, so make sure to check each of these areas as thoroughly as possible. 

Whether or not you’re able to find the source, it’s always best to call a licensed basement waterproofing company. An experienced professional will be able to pinpoint the cause of the leak and begin to form a plan to keep the basement a dry and healthy space within the home. 

What resources are available?

Being such a large landmass, the United States has many different climates all jumbled together. Different climates means different soil types, which will retain different amounts of water. To help keep track of this, there are Groundwater Maps that show the different levels of groundwater across the nation.  

Seeing as there are 50 states that make up our considerably sized nation, it can get a bit confusing when looking for resources categorized by state. For this reason, we’ve compiled an easy to navigate list of these resources--so you don’t have to go crazy searching. 

 

Alabama

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Alaska

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Arizona

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Arkansas 

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California

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Colorado

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Connecticut

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Delaware

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Washington D.C.

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Florida

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Georgia

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Hawaii

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Idaho 

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Illinois

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Indiana 

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Iowa

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Kansas

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Kentucky

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Louisiana

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Maine

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Maryland

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Massachusetts

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Michigan 

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Minnesota

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Mississippi 

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Missouri

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Montana

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Nebraska

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Nevada

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New Hampshire

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New Jersey

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New Mexico

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New York

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North Carolina

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North Dakota

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Ohio

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Oklahoma 

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Oregon

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Pennsylvania 

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Rhode Island

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South Carolina

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South Dakota

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Tennessee  

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Texas

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Utah

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Vermont 

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Virginia

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Washington

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West Virginia

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Wisconsin

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Wyoming 

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Basement flooding is a common problem in most areas around the country, especially areas with more temperate climates, that experience a fair amount of precipitation each year. The ground is already holding moisture, and when heavy storms come, the soil simply can’t retain anymore, causing the water to search for a new place to go. The trouble is that typically, homeowners insurance will not cover a basement flood. If the water is found to have come from a burst pipe, broken appliance or fixture, the insurance policy will apply--but if the source is a crack, gap or damaged window seal, there’s nothing that can be done by Insurance. 

 

Because of this, many waterproofing professionals have set up Financing Programs, to help homeowners when insurance doesn’t cover the damage. 

What should you expect?

The stress of a water event is a lot to handle, and having a clear idea of what’s going to happen next can do a lot to relieve that stress. There are some government resources that shed light on waterproofing processes that can help prevent damage to the home in the event of future water issues, but most deal with major flooding events, rather than groundwater floods in the basement. 

 

There are a variety of ways to protect your home from groundwater, and the course of action to be taken will depend upon your homes specific needs. Factors such as the material of the foundation, the type of soil around the home, and the amount of groundwater in the area will all play into the final system and which products will be used to protect the home from further incidents. 


If you’ve experienced a flood or serious water event in the basement, the experts here at Basement Systems are here to help, reach out today!

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